Climate CHIP Publications

The 2018 report of the Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change

Authors: 
Watts N, et al. ..... Kjellstrom T, ..... Lemke B, ...... (63 co-authors)
Year: 
2018

The Lancet Countdown: tracking progress on health and climate change was established to provide an independent, global monitoring system dedicated to tracking the health dimensions of the impacts of, and the response to, climate change. The Lancet Countdown tracks 41 indicators across five domains: climate change impacts, exposures, and vulnerability; adaptation, planning, and resilience for health; mitigation actions and health co-benefits; finance and economics; and public and political engagement.

Impact of climate and air pollution on acute coronary syndromes: an update from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2017.

Authors: 
Kaluzna-Oleksy M, Aunan K, Rao-Skirbekk S, Kjellstrom T, Ezekowitz JA, Agewall S, Atar D
Year: 
2018

NO ABSTRACT. THIS IS THE FIRST FEW PARAGRAPHS During the recent European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2017 several papers reported data on air pollution and ambient temperature in relation to myocardial infarction (MI). Environmental stressors have an unquestionable influence on cardiac health. In fact, global climate change may lead to a variety of negative effects on health, including increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Occupational heat stress assessment and protective strategies in the context of climate change

Authors: 
Chuansi Gao, Kalev Kuklane, Per-Olof Östergren, Tord Kjellstrom
Year: 
2018

Global warming will unquestionably increase the impact of heat on individuals who work in already hot workplaces in hot climate areas. The increasing prevalence of this environmental health risk requires the improvement of assessment methods linked to meteorological data. Such new methods will help to reveal the size of the problem and design appropriate interventions at individual, workplace and societal level.

Invited editorial: climate change impacts on working people: how to develop prevention policies

Authors: 
Nilsson M, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2018

The evidence on negative consequences from climate change on human health and well-being is growing (1–5). The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) described climate change as a threat to the climate system that sets the basis for life and human health conditions (6). The changing climate is expected to affect basic requirements needed to support and sustain human health such as good food, clean water, and unpolluted air, with negative effects that are expected to be unequally distributed.

Is ambient heat exposure levels associated with miscarriage or stillbirths in hot regions? A cross-sectional study using survey data from the Ghana Maternal Health Survey 2007

Authors: 
Benedict Asamoah, Tord Kjellstrom, Per-Olof Östergren
Year: 
2018

It is well established that high ambient heat could cause congenital abnormalities resulting in miscarriage or stillbirth among certain species of mammals. However, this has not been systematically studied in real field settings among humans, despite the potential value of such knowledge for estimating the impact of global warming on the human species.

Climate conditions, workplace heat and occupational health in South-East Asia in the context of climate change

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Lemke B, Otto M
Year: 
2017

Occupational health is particularly affected by high heat exposures in workplaces, which will be an increasing problem as climate change progresses. People working in jobs of moderate or heavy work intensity in hot environments are at particular risk, owing to exposure to high environmental heat and internal heat production. This heat needs to be released to protect health, and such release is difficult or impossible at high temperatures and high air humidity. A range of clinical health effects can occur, and the heat-related physical

Time-motion analysis as a novel approach for evaluating the impact of environmental heat exposure on labor loss in agriculture workers

Authors: 
Ioannou LG, Tsoutsoubi L, Samoutis G, Kajfez Bogataj L, Kenny GP, Nybo L, Kjellstrom T, Flouris AD
Year: 
2017

Introduction: In this study we (i) introduced time-motion analysis for assessing the impact of workplace heat on the work shift time spent doing labor (WTL) of grape-picking workers, (ii) examined whether seasonal environmental differences can influence their WTL, and (iii) investigated whether their WTL can be assessed by monitoring productivity or the vineyard manager's estimate of WTL. Methods: Seven grape-picking workers were assessed during the summer and/or autumn via video throughout four work shifts.