Climate CHIP Publications

Urban Health Inequities and the added pressure of Climate Change: An Action-Oriented Research Agenda

Authors: 
Friel S, Hancock T, Kjellstrom T, McGranahan G, Monge P, Roy Y
Year: 
2011

Climate change will likely exacerbate already existing urban social inequities and health risks, thereby exacerbating existing urban health inequities. Cities in low- and middle-income countries are particularly vulnerable. Urbanization is both a cause of and potential solution to global climate change. Most population growth in the foreseeable future will occur in urban areas primarily in developing countries.

Climate change and rising heat: population health implications for working people in Australia

Authors: 
Hanna EG, Kjellstrom T, Bennett C, Dear K.
Year: 
2011

The rapid rise in extreme heat events in Australia recently is already taking a health toll. Climate change scenarios predict increases in the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events in the future, and population health may be significantly compromised for people who cannot reduce their heat exposure. Exposure to extreme heat presents a health hazard to all who are physically active, particularly outdoor workers and indoor workers with minimal access to cooling systems while working.

Workplace heat stress in the context of rising temperature in India.

Authors: 
Dash SK, Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2011

Heat stress is an important aspect in the lives of people working under exposed conditions for long hours. It is interesting to examine the impact of global warming on the occurrence of heat stress in India. This study uses India Meteorological Department (IMD) daily temperature gridded data to investigate the changes in frequency and episodes of extreme temperature events in seven temperature homogenous regions and the country as a whole by applying the guidelines suggested by the World Meteorological Organization ‘Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices’. It is

Climate change, occupational health and workplace productivity.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2011

Climate change will increase the average global temperature, but there will be substantial variation in local regions. A variety of potential health impacts have been identified. One issue of emerging concern is high heat exposure in workplaces, both indoors and outdoors. This is already a major problem for people with physically demanding work in places with very hot seasons each year. Heat stress creates physiological change, clinical health effects and lowered work capacity, which for some people reduces their hourly productivity and income. The economic

Heat impact on school children in Cameroon, Africa: potential health threat from climate change

Authors: 
Dapi LN, Rocklov J, Nguefack-Tsague G, Tetanye E, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2010

Background: Health impacts related to climate change are potentially an increasing problem in Cameroon, especially during hot seasons when there are no means for protective and adaptive actions. Objective: To describe environmental conditions in schools and to evaluate the impact of heat on schoolchildren's health during school days in the Cameroon cities of Yaoundé and Douala. Methods: Schoolchildren (N=285) aged 12–16 years from public secondary schools completed a questionnaire about their background, general symptoms, and hot feelings in a cross-sectional study.

Public health impact of global heating due to climate change – potential effects on chronic non-communicable diseases

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Butler A-J, Lucas R, Bonita R.
Year: 
2010

Objectives Several categories of ill health important at the global level are likely to be affected by climate change. To date the focus of this association has been on communicable diseases and injuries. This paper briefly analyzes potential impacts of global climate change on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Method We reviewed the limited available evidence of the relationships between climate exposure and chronic and NCDs. We further reviewed likely mechanisms and pathways for climatic influences on chronic disease occurrence and impacts on pre-existing chronic diseases. Results